Food Stamps Cooking: Noodling…

February 10th, 2016 by admin No comments »

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The Club House has been a hub of excitement and activity!  We’ve been noodling around!  grin/giggle

Our church participates in the annual Lenten Luncheon series every year.  The first year we moved into this community the ladies’ group chose to make Sloppy Joes for the meal they prepared.  When beef prices skyrocketed and buns became too rich for our blood, the menu was changed to chicken and noodles.

Every year, Delilah, bless her heart, would purchase and boil up chicken breasts, cook up all the noodles and package everything into plastic bags.  On the day we served, all the church ladies would descend on the local Baptist Center’s kitchen and heat everything to perfection, lay out a collection of salads and host the ‘party…’

Delilah left us not so long ago so The Normanator and I took up the mantle.  We planned to buy the meat a little at a time so as not to assault our budget.  You can imagine our delight and surprise when we answered the door one evening to find that a Good Samaritan was bringing us FORTY POUNDS (40#) of chicken thighs, compliments of his generous heart.

We stashed the gift in our freezer until last week, when we thawed the chicken and began to season and roast it.  We filled a 7 quart roaster, a 4 quart roaster and a 3 quart roaster.  Each layer was carefully seasoned with salt, pepper and poultry seasoning and roasted in the oven for hours on end.  The house smelled of Thanksgiving and we thanked Delilah and our benefactor.  When everything was cooked and cooled the meat was taken off the bones and packaged into one quart plastic bags. They were packed into the freezer one more time!

In Delilah’s absence and to honor her memory, The Normanator and I took on the challenge of cooking all those noodles.  Someone shopped at Sam’s Club and brought us three great ginormous bags of dry noodles.  We giggled at the industrial size of them.  And then we boiled water, broth  and more of both to get them cooked!  It was a marathon!

Prior to serving the meal, we’ll thaw the meat, add it to the noodles, along with more broth and a big bag of frozen peas. There will also be some sauteed onion and celery pieces.   The offering will fill a large roaster with amazing flavor, color and texture. It will smell divine!  This will provide the main dish and there will be an array of salads to accompany it.  Our ladies are amazing cooks and they will do us proud!

It was a good call, changing the menu.  Even in quantity it is an easy meal to prepare and carry to the venue.  It is simple and filling, yet nourishing.  Many of the people who will share this meal are elderly.  Meat can difficult for them to chew, that age group does not want large portions and it is a menu that creates winners all the way around.  We will leave it to the ministerial association to nourish our souls.

People who depend on Public Assistance for their food dollars must rethink their menus because of costs or availability…if you hold an EBT card for WIC or SNAP you know this all too well.  If you use food commodities you are probably clever at adapting meals using what’s on hand.  Stretching food dollars and food budgets is no easy feat, especially if you are using Public Assistance. *That’s why this blog came into being.  We want to help any way we can.  We love hearing from our Members at foodstampscookingclub@gmail.com

Connie Baum

 

 

Food Stamps Cooking: SOUP DAY!

February 4th, 2016 by admin 2 comments »
This is perfect for National Soup Day!

This would be great for observing National  Soup Day! Some veg, broth, a bit of meat and it’s done! National Soup Day.

Happy National SOUP DAY!  When The Normanator and I learned that today is a special day, we all but cheered!  We LOVE soup and often joke that we would eat it for breakfast if it were available!

There are jillions of soup recipes.  This post is not about recipes; it is about creating something yummy with whatever you find in your kitchen.  And making a soup supper an experience.

If you aim for convenience (and who does not?) may I suggest that you use cans of veggies?  A can of corn, a can of green beans, a can of tomatoes, and if you are really feeling flush and well supplied, you could throw in some meat. Onions and celery make good additions to soup, too, as does cabbage!  *So do leftover vegetables that may be languishing in your refrigerator.  Cooked rice, barley or any other grain will “beef” up your soup…**Think quinoa, wheat berries, macaroni, lentils or beans.

Sometimes meat is unavailable.  Meat is spendy.  If you have a veggie soup and a cheese sandwich, you are fortunate.  If you are really lucky you might even have the fixings for a salad.  I am thinking Peas and Cheese salad…canned peas, whatever cheese you can grate or chop and some onion or pickle with a dab of mayo will really make your soup meal shine.

Another partner for soup could be a carrot salad and this is a great thing to get kids to eat their vegetables.  Finely grate some carrots, toss in some cranberries or raisins, a dab of mayo and make mounds of salad on shredded cabbage or lettuce leaves, using an ice cream scoop.

When I was a kid my mom would make soup by boiling veggies, draining the water, adding whatever veggies–taters, carrots, onions, celery, for example.  Then she would add milk or broth, depending what she had on hand.  She seasoned the food with salt and pepper and we enjoyed the result of her labor.

When I grew up and found the Food Network I learned that sauteing the onions, carrots, taters or whichever vegetable will be in the soup is a nifty trick for adding flavor.  You can use vegetable oil to keep things moist and then build your soup from there.

SIDEBAR:  The suggestion is made to saute the vegetables. This does not mean that if you do NOT saute them that the Kitchen Police will nab you.  Do what works for YOU in your kitchen!  END SIDEBAR.

Go survey your pantry shelves and your fridge.  Determine what is available.  Do you have foods that are green or yellow or orange or white?  Do you have tomatoes?  How about garlic, if your gang fancies it?  You might have onion powder or cumin or chili powder or some other flavor that could be added.  Taste your concoction, add a pinch of flavor and taste it again. Playing with your food in this way makes for full flavor!

After you have decided what you’ll put into your soup, put some effort into setting an inviting table.  Use mugs for the soup instead of bowls for a change.  If you have place mats, that will make a nice touch.  No mats?  How about paper towels or clean hand towels from your bathroom shelf?  Making a nice table, sharing a meal with your loved ones, engaging in meaningful tabletop conversation can shape your children’s lives in wonderful ways.  Little people love to decorate paper table cloths or paper napkins with crayons and art work…

Many people like crackers in their soup. Some people place a slice of bread in the bottom of their bowl and pour the soup over it. You can also use popped corn to top off any soup.  Kids think this is great fun.

Personally, I love to cook.  Not everybody likes to cook, has the time to cook or the  ingredients on hand to make soup or any other meal.  It’s quite possible you never learned to cook for whatever reasons.  Maybe you need a mentor.  Ask a neighbor or relative or friend to take you under their wing and show you the tips that make their kitchen turn out great food.  People love to help one another. Your local Action Center offers cooking classes, too.  In Southeast Nebraska there is no cost for these lessons.  For those of you who are in the Tecumseh, NE area you can call the office for information about the classes:  402 335 2134 and ask for Terri.

This little corner of the internet aims to help those who depend on Public Assistance for their food dollars and the Club House is always open for people who want to learn to cook.  You are welcome to contact us by emailing foodstampscookingclub@gmail.com.  Oh, how we love mail!

As you probably know, this blog is dedicated to helping people who use Public Assistance for their food dollars.  You may hold an EBT card for WIC or SNAP…you may be using goods from food commodities or a food pantry.  Maybe you attended a food drop or someone gifted you with some foodstuffs.  In any case, our purpose here is to help you stretch your food budget and let you know that someone cares about your situation, whatever it may be.

Happy National Soup Day, kids!  I hope this post has helped you.  Please consider yourself hugged.

Connie Baum 

PS:  Check out Carol’s blog!  She has a soup recipe you’ll love!  *Her blog is snazzier than this one, too! grin

Food Stamps Cooking: OATmeal!

January 18th, 2016 by admin 2 comments »
Humble OATM

Humble OATMEAL.  A hard worker in any kitchen.

As you may have suspected, I have once again been plagued by IT issues.  I also have a very wide lazy streak in me.  But today something happened that got my attention.  Since my IT guru has me back up and running I got an email from a faithful Food Stamps Cooking Club follower. *Did I mention how much we love mail around here?  Ya. I’m sure I did.

Sheila is Queen of her Castle and pointed a grateful me to a cute blog, Pantry Anarchy.  I “liked” her Facebook page and asked if I could pinch her post for you.  She readily agreed so here you go, kids:

Pantry Anarchy is a well written blog about pinching pennies and it is punctuated with social comment and opinions.  *My kind o peeps!  You will appreciate the idea shared about using packets of instant oatmeal in a refreshing (and inexpensive) new way.  It was kind of Sheila to share her wisdom with us.  Let’s all cruise over there and sign up for their email messages.  We can all learn from one another, after all.

As for what is happening in the Club House, we have been eating out of our freezer.  As you know, I am a huge fan of cooking once and eating twice (or more).  The Food Fairy blessed us with FORTY POUNDS of meat so that’s waiting in the freezer for a meal our church will be serving.  Nestled along with that, we have a good number of containers of frozen soup, just waiting to be thawed, heated and enjoyed.  It saves fuel costs by not having to prepare 3 meals every day–not much energy is used when just reheating previously cooked food.

I’ve also taken advantage of oven heat by baking a large number of potatoes at one time; salads are a quick fix, low energy meal that provide oodles of nutrition in one bowl.

It would be interesting to note what YOU are doing to manage your food dollars!  Let us know by shooting an email to foodstampscookingclub@gmail.com and we’ll do the Happy Dance!

Let’s hope you are staying warm if you are in a snow band, like we have been.  And remember that you are loved and appreciated!

PS/Remember to leave some love for the Pantry Anarchy when you visit their blog!

Food Stamps Cooking: Holidays

November 24th, 2015 by admin No comments »

 

It's a pity you cannot SMELL this luscious soup!

It’s a pity you cannot SMELL this luscious soup!

When our guys come home for any visit they clamor for this soup! It is only cauliflower and onions but they fancy it is a gourmet offering!

It is a thick, flavorful broth that begs for crusty bread or crackers.  We usually have a green salad with it; sometimes it’s a fruit salad.

If cauliflower is not available you can substitute cabbage.  All I do is steam a head of cauliflower…if I were to use cabbage, I’d chop and steam that…and I saute a couple of large onions.  I work in batches to whirl the ingredients  in the food processor.  *You could use a blender, too.  The idea is to make a smooth, creamy soup.  It would be just as tasty if you simply combine the cooked vegetables without blending or processing.  You’ll have a thinner, soupier consistency but the flavor will be the same: GREAT!

To make it creamy I made a gravy (See the video if gravy is a mystery to you.).  I combined everything, added salt and pepper an stirred it.  When I tasted it, I felt that it needed “something” so I put some chicken stock into the mix.  *If you have bullion cubes you can use that with water.  It boosted the flavor and made it a bit thinner.  When I serve this I will sprinkle some parsley over the top of each bowl.  I am blessed to have fresh parsley but I would not hesitate to use dried herbs.

This takes some doing but it is EASY and very economical.  Often you’ll find onions at special prices.  The thing about soup is that when your family gathers for a meal the clean up is minimal.  That leaves more time for card playing, visiting, and looking through photo albums!

If you are a user of WIC or SNAP’s EBT cards you are likely interested to learn how to s t r e t c h those food dollars.  Maybe you have things from a food pantry, food drop or you get food commodities.  In any case, we are dedicated to serving those of you who use Public Assistance for your food dollars.  We only want to help.  We are not selling a thing.  If you want to become a Member you will receive a little series of cooking tips.

When this little  blog was created, Mother Connie was warned that users of Public Assistance would never find it.  Well, I’m here to tell you that users of Public Assistance are always looking for the best ways to help themselves.  I recently had a message from someone who felt she had benefited immensely from the ideas presented here.  This sort of feedback is what keeps Mother Connie searching for ways to keep on keeping on!

Happy Thanksgiving to you all!

Connie Baum

The FTC wants you to know there might be links on this page. Should they be clicked, resulting in sales, your humble blogger would be fairly compensated. Please do your due diligence when conducting affairs online or offline. Always do business with those you trust implicitly. If you are reading this outside of the USA, you may be leaving cookies behind. If you are reading this outside of the USA, you may be leaving cookies behind.

Food Stamps Cooking: Stew

November 19th, 2015 by admin 6 comments »
Tummy warming veg and meat with a savory gravy is perfect to serve your family AND your guests!

Tummy warming veg and meat with a savory gravy is perfect to serve your family AND your guests!

We had a guest who came for coffee and stayed for lunch!  The photo above shows you what we served her.  It must have been good, because when she was offered seconds, she readily agreed to have more!

It was a simple dish and food budget friendly.

I took cooked beef-you could use ground beef or poultry or even canned meat-and I made gravy.

SIDEBAR:  You can choose to make brown gravy or white (cream) gravy.  I made brown gravy so I used a bit of oil and added some flour and beef broth.  The video for gravy shows how to make cream gravy.  Both are as easy as can be.  END SIDEBAR.

The vegetables I used were onion, carrot and celery.  Classic trinity. You could use that or you could choose whatever you find in your pantry.  You could augment the trinity with your canned choice.   I sauteed the veggies til they were soft and then added them to the beef and gravy.  Before I served this dish I added dried kale bits and parsley for a bit of color and additional nutrition.

Dessert was strawberries, which were a gift from a dear relative we visited over the weekend!  Mmmmm…such great flavor.

It’s so easy to make tasty dishes, even if you are using an EBT card for WIC or SNAP.  If you have food commodities it’s easy to ‘build’ a stew with those supplies.  Choose your foods wisely, using TLC for your food budget.  You really do have a choice and that would be to pay the grocer or the doctor.  I am living proof that good nutrition makes for robust health.

Connie Baum

The FTC wants you to know there might be links on this page. Should they be clicked, resulting in sales, your humble blogger would be fairly compensated. Please do your due diligence when conducting affairs online or offline. Always do business with those you trust implicitly. If you are reading this outside of the USA, you may be leaving cookies behind. If you are reading this outside of the USA, you may be leaving cookies behind.

Food Stamps Cooking: MAIL!

November 4th, 2015 by admin No comments »
Is that money in the pocket of Mother Connie's apron?

Is that money in the pocket of Mother Connie’s apron? No, it must be snail mail…

As you all must know by now, Mother Connie adores mail!  One of our faithful sent a bit of a rant and I wanted to share it with you because Delaine makes some salient points.  She always expresses her ideas directly from her heart.  Her letter is unedited; here’s hoping it trips your trigger and touches you the way it touched me:

“Nov 1

It seems to me that the time between Samhain (aka Halloween) and New Years is shorter every year. Still, the *feast* days in this time are always a source of goodness to us. We celebrate the good things we have and try to share as much as we can.

I recently had the experience of housing a young man who is homeless. It’s a complicated story, and not even a tenth of the success of my *far-to-young-mother” who is doing very well. One of the things that has become ever more, sadly, apparent to me is the observation that I made years ago. In the USA, hunger is not an absence of food, but an absence of knowledge. I just walked around my block here in Sacramento, CA, and found much that was just growing and hanging over the fence lines. Figs, lemons, oranges, crab apples, pomegranates, not to mention the salad growing through the cracks in the sidewalk: arugula, red lettuce, dandelions, wild onions, wild leeks and a plethora of other growing things, not to mention the gleanings from the local farms that are just not economical to harvest mechanically. I am not advocating urban hunter-gathering, but the amazing abundance here is comforting. I guess it’s one of my “grateful for” things.

Nevertheless, one of the points that I make over and again, especially as I teach cooking, is that the very basic skills are just not being taught. I remember (far too long ago) that there was a set of “survival courses” that we had to have 1 elective credit in order to graduate. This was the most practical and useful course in my entire education next to typing. In the curriculum, we learned basic auto maintenance like checking the fluid levels, belt conditions etc, and basic cooking skills (boil, braise, roast, grill, stir fry and bake) and a variety of things that are amazingly useful like how to re-wire a bad light switch. We also learned how to read technical things and interpret what is meant. Oh – for the good old days when we didn’t spend so much money and time teaching tests.

What I am kvetching about is that this young man had food stamps and means to get to food banks, but had no concept with regard to how to cook anything much less over an open fire, an impromptu grill, and forget about making a dirt oven to bake anything. I put a few pounds on him, got him some practical cooking skills, and cured his scurvy. (That’s right – vitamin c deficiency with lemons and oranges hanging over the fence waiting to be picked and either eaten right away or turned into lemonade!)

So anyway, thanks for letting me vent my ire about the failures of our educational system – as only a retired teacher can do – and the fact that hunger is a function of ignorance!”  ~Delaine

Thank you for all you do, Delaine.  And thank you for putting something into our mailbox!

For those of you who may be new here, we want you to know that this corner of the internet is dedicated to users of public assistance for their food dollars.

If your food budget is supported by an EBT card from WIC or SNAP or you are using goods from a food drop, food pantry or have food commodities on your shelves, you are welcome here.  So are those who are frugal by nature!  Everyone is welcome.  We hope to be of help to you whether you are a seasoned cook or just a newbie in the kitchen.  We want you all to be healthy and it’s important to eat well and wisely, most especially if you are on a tight food budget.

We love mail, as you are well aware.  If you send us a message our hearts will go pitter patter:  foodstampscookingclub@gmail.com

If you are in the Tecumseh, NE area, you might be interested to know that there will be a Cooking Class on Friday, November 13 at SENCA.  There is no charge for this class about SALADS but to save your place at the table, please let Terri know by calling 402 335 2134.

Connie Baum

The FTC wants you to know there might be links on this page. Should they be clicked, resulting in sales, your humble blogger would be fairly compensated. Please do your due diligence when conducting affairs online or offline. Always do business with those you trust implicitly. If you are reading this outside of the USA, you may be leaving cookies behind. If you are reading this outside of the USA, you may be leaving cookies behind.

Food Stamps Cooking: BEAN SOUP!

November 2nd, 2015 by admin No comments »

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Ham broth and bits of ham from the freezer made for a yummy soup!

The Normanator and I are making every effort to prepare our meals by using food we’ve stashed in the freezer in order to make room for the piggy we’ve ordered from Norm’s cousin.  This piggy has been feasting on vegetables and watermelons and such like all summer; it should provide us with wonderful protein.

We invited a dear friend to join us so I wanted to present LOTS of nutrition for her lunch time pleasure!

To make this soup I placed the chunk of frozen ham broth into a 3 quart saucepan and heated it through thoroughly.  While it was parked on the back burner, the front burner held a skillet filled with onions, carrots, celery happy to be sauteed.  It begged for salt, pepper and a quick shake of onion powder.  By the way, it SMELLED divine.  I opened a can of white beans and placed the whole works, juice and all, into the ham broth.

SIDEBAR:  Canned beans in this house is convenience food.  While it may be ideal to use dry beans that have been soaked, on this occasion I chose to raid the pantry.  Canned beans are often found in bundles of food from food pantries or food drops, so users of SNAP or WIC which are paid for by EBT cards can also catch a break with canned beans.  END SIDEBAR.

The flavors married nicely as the sauteed veg were poured into the “hot tub” of broth with ham bits.  While they mingled I made a dessert that won the hearts of the people at our table.

I was so excited to make this dessert that I forgot to take a picture!  my bad…

Three apples were peeled and placed into a bowl of salted water so the flesh did not turn brown.  One by one, they were cored and sliced and placed into a heavy skillet along with a pat of butter and a splash of coconut oil.  I stirred them often, coating each slice with the oil/butter combo.  When they began to soften I sprinkled everything with cinnamon and a bit of sugar.  *My mom used to use brown sugar.  Either would do nicely.  Before they finished cooking I added a few drops of water and a handful of raisins.

No one spoke during the meal.  All we heard from the three of us were slurps of soup and murmurs of “Mmmm!”

The cost of this soup was nearly nil.  Two carrots, one small onion, 2 ribs of celery and broth with ham bits from the freezer kept the ledger in the black.  The apples were bought in bulk so we think they were about 15 cents apiece.

Now I’m dreaming of pork chops with apple slices…grin/giggle

Our mail was wonderful this morning…one of our precious members is doing a great service in her part of the world and she shared her story.  I will share that message with you SOON.

Are you relieved that we are not hounding you to BUY something? Nothing to buy here…we only share ideas that might help you to s t r e t c h your food dollars.

Please remember that you are loved and appreciated.

Connie Baum

The FTC wants you to know there might be links on this page. Should they be clicked, resulting in sales, your humble blogger would be fairly compensated. Please do your due diligence when conducting affairs online or offline. Always do business with those you trust implicitly. If you are reading this outside of the USA, you may be leaving cookies behind. If you are reading this outside of the USA, you may be leaving cookies behind.

PLEASE TAKE NOTE: Because of scheduling issues, the Cooking Class planned for November 6 in Tecumseh, NE has been set instead for Friday, November 13th.  This class is still offered at no charge but it is important for you to save your place at the table by calling  402 335 2134. Ask for Terri.

Food Stamps Cooking: #HASH!

October 28th, 2015 by admin No comments »

I’m thinking these ingredients will make a dandy hash for our lunch!

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Whenever possible I like to cook once and eat twice (or more)!  Some time back I browned some ground beef; I labeled and dated it and popped it into the freezer.  Last night I moved it to the fridge to thaw.  I poked around the pantry and found a can of wax beans…thinking of color, I imagined a colorful lunch to delight The Normanator, who is a meat and potatoes kind of guy!

I will combine the famous trilogy: onions/carrots/celery with the beef.  I’ll peel and chop the potatoes. Nothing is easier than a one skillet meal!   A bit of salt and pepper and I’ll have a quick, easy, frugal main course.  The wax beans, heated in a saucepan, will round it out!  YUM.

When you are working *outside the home you arrive at mealtime, tired and hungry.  By combining these simple ingredients you can create a filling and nutritious offering for those you love quick as a wink.  You get bonus points if you can persuade the family to help peel carrots or taters; double bonus points if they will help with the chopping! grin

 

*This is just as true if you are working INSIDE your home, you stay at home mommies n daddies!

 

SIDEBAR: It is enormously helpful if you can spend some time on your day off or in an evening to pre-cut your veggies and keep them covered in water in the fridge.  That will cut down on your prep time when you are ready to cook. END SIDEBAR

If you have EBT cards from SNAP or WIC you are the people to whom we have devoted this corner of the internet.  Do you use  food pantry food?  Are you receiving food commodities or picking up goods from a food drop?  Any of you who depend on public assistance for your food dollars are the ones about whom we are concerned.  We hope to help you eat well and wisely and on a tight budget.

You are welcome to contact us at foodstampscookingclub@gmail.com.  The comment panel on this blog is closed.

Connie Baum

PS/We are excited to announce that there will be a Cooking Class at SENCA in Tecumseh, NE on November 4!  There is no cost but to save your place at the table you need to call 402 335 2134 and let Terri know you are planning to come learn about SALADS!

The FTC wants you to know there might be links on this page. Should they be clicked, resulting in sales, your humble blogger would be fairly compensated. Please do your due diligence when conducting affairs online or offline. Always do business with those you trust implicitly. If you are reading this outside of the USA, you may be leaving cookies behind. If you are reading this outside of the USA, you may be leaving cookies behind.

Food Stamps Cooking in the Clubhouse

October 23rd, 2015 by admin No comments »

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This is Nikki, a young mother who came to the Clubhouse to cook!  She copied Mother Connie’s favorite spaghetti sauce recipe so she can use some of the tomatoes she canned from her garden!

It was thrilling to have Nikki ask to come and cook with Mother Connie!  She had some end of the garden goodies; I had some pantry items.  We decided to make soup, talk about cooking and food and hang out together!  Her husband brought their children when it was time to eat and another family of four joined us for the party!

Before Nikki arrived I assembled a few items to incorporate into our soup:

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Not sure what Nikki would bring, I thought we could begin with the famous onion/carrot/celery threesome and these items.

I drizzled a bit of oil into a large pot and added the goodies to soften them and add savor to the soup…

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As these veggies sauteed I added a bit of salt and pepper.  When Nikki arrived, we added her eggplant, potatoes, more carrots, and some canned tomatoes.  We also used a spoonful or so of tomato paste and just a touch of sugar (to cut the tomato a tad).   We had LOTS of broth and we added a bit of water, and  some precooked quinoa.  There was frozen corn and frozen peas to add for flavor, nutrition and color. Nikki had dehydrated some kale so those flakes were sprinkled in to add color, flavor and nourishment.  Vegetable broth was added to give dimension to the flavor profile and add volume.  We talked about how we could have used cabbage or noodles or other vegetable combinations. We added some basil to the soup just before it was served. YUM YUM YUM

Since Nikki and her family are vegetarian we talked about all the ways there are to get complete protein.  She is well aware of how important optimum nutrition is and we swapped ideas about what to cook and how to make various dishes or adapt them.

We also made a ginormous salad (which of course we forgot to photograph!).  We began by shredding dark greens.  We added tender, sweet butter lettuce pieces we tore. Then we layered kidney beans, cranberries, quinoa, almond slivers, Napa cabbage, broccoli and tossed everything together.  Shame on Mother Connie for not capturing the beauty of the greens on camera!

We laid everything out on the table and served the food buffet style from the stove.  One of our little guests, Ava, who is 10, brought a loaf of soda bread to share THAT SHE HAD BAKED ALL BY HERSELF!  It was tasty and crusty and made a fine partner for the loaf of sourdough bread that Nikki brought to share!

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I think the littlest guests had fun:

IMG_20151021_185628550Jack, Eli, Ava and Lucy had the kitchen to themselves!

The afternoon and evening was more of a party than a cooking class!  It made my heart go pitter-patter.  I was as happy as a pig in mud! 

If you have garden goodies left you are no doubt fixing stir fry dishes, soups and canning or freezing things as you have the time. Maybe you use  food from a food pantry or you have food commodities.  If you have an EBT card from SNAP or WIC it’s likely you have created home made soups and such like.  Maybe you have played with the seasonings to suit your family’s fancy.  In any case this little corner of the internet is devoted to those of you who struggle mightily with  your food budget.  We hope to help you stretch the food dollars and eat as well and wisely as you possibly can.  If you have joined our ranks and are receiving the little series of cooking tips we offer, we dearly hope you find them helpful.

Our comment panel is closed but you are always invited to send your thoughts to foodstampscookingclub@gmail.com

Connie Baum

PS/ SENCA will be offering another cooking class in Tecumseh, Nebraska in November; details will be forthcoming.  There will be no cost but interested people can reserve a spot at the table by calling 402 335 2134.  Ask for Terri.

The FTC wants you to know there might be links on this page. Should they be clicked, resulting in sales, your humble blogger would be fairly compensated. Please do your due diligence when conducting affairs online or offline. Always do business with those you trust implicitly. If you are reading this outside of the USA, you may be leaving cookies behind. If you are reading this outside of the USA, you may be leaving cookies behind

Food Stamps Cooking: TOMATOES!

October 14th, 2015 by admin 1 comment »

 

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The Tomato Fairy has been very kind to us!

The tomato season is winding down…far too fast for this Nebraska girl.  Oh, how we love the plump, juicy beauties during tomato season!  We have been fortunate to be the recipients of  OPG…other people’s gardens.  We made short shrift of every tomato that crossed our threshold!

The lovelies you see here  were prepared very simply.  I washed them, dropped them into a pot of boiling water til the skins popped.  Then I peeled them carefully and quartered them.  The juice just RAN!  After they were snuggled in the bowl I sprinkled some basil over the whole bunch.

SIDEBAR: Dry basil will work just fine if that’s what you have.  I was fortunate to have frozen basil, which is essentially fresh.  Fresh herbs add a brightness that enhances the flavor of the tomatoes.  Whenever you have freshly grown basil, simply put some in each cup of an ice cube tray, add a touch of water to each cup and freeze as if they were simply ice cubes.  When you need a touch of brightness for your spaghetti sauce or other dishes, simply pull out what you need and use as if it were freshly cut!  END SIDEBAR.

These tomatoes were salted a wee bit, peppered liberally, and just a ‘scosh’ of sugar got sprinkled over  the whole works.  ‘Scosh’ is a technical cooking term my dad made up.  It means ‘just a little bit’…grin.  I also dribbled a teeny tiny bit of olive oil over the tomatoes so they’d be more ‘dressed’…can’t serve naked tomatoes, after all.  giggle.

If you have canned whole tomatoes, which can be found in food pantry bundles or food commodities you can season those just as I have described.  Tomatoes is one of those foods that helps keep the food budget intact because tomatoes can be used in a variety of ways.

Do you have an EBT card for WIC or SNAP?  Do you find yourselves living on a dime?  Are you watching your food dollars like a hawk because you receive public assistance?  Or, maybe you just enjoy the ‘game’ of being frugal.  In any case, this little piece of the internet is dedicated to those of you who may not be gourmet cooks but you are feeding your family on a shoestring budget.  We GET it.  We want to help.

If you have signed up to be a Member of this bunch, we welcome you warmly to the Club House.  If you are receiving the little cooking tips we send along we hope you find them helpful.  We love hearing from our members at foodstampscookingclub@gmail.com.

Connie Baum

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