Archive for the ‘How To’ category

Food Stamps Cooking Club: Egg Yolk Video Tutorial

January 13th, 2014

People who are learning to cook will discover that sometimes eggs need to have the yolks separated from the whites.  Here is an entertaining way to accomplish that:

Are YOU learning to cook?  Are you receiving public assistance for your food budget?  Do you find yourself living on a dime?  Do you have an EBT card for WIC or SNAP?  Do you visit a food pantry or receive food commodities?  If your answer to any of these questions is ‘yes’ then you have found a place to belong.  This corner of the internet is dedicated to YOU.  There is nothing to buy and no obligation…how refreshing is THAT?

This video is part of the series we are calling our Cooking Class.  We believe that if you know how to cook you can save all kinds of money.  We know this from our own life experience.

We just love hearing from you…either on the comment panel below this post or by email:  foodstampscookingclub@gmail.com.

Please  bear in mind that you are dearly loved.

Connie Baum

The FTC wants you to know there are links on this page. Should they be clicked, resulting in sales, your humble blogger would be fairly compensated. Please do your due diligence when conducting affairs online or offline. Always do business with those you trust implicitly.

 

Food Stamps Cooking Club: EGGS!

January 3rd, 2014

Holiday 13 and beyond fscc 020Perfectly cooked eggs are easy-peasy!

Allow me to begin with a disclaimer, of sorts.  The food safety police will hunt me down for major punishment if they read this, because I’m going to advocate that you do something they would never approve!

To hard cook eggs to perfection, it is critical to the process to leave the eggs on the kitchen table, in their carton, overnight.  Mother Connie realizes this is counter intuitive but if you want pretty eggs that look as good as the one on the gingham plate, this is Step One.  **My own mother did this and no one made finer hard cooked eggs than she!

The next step is to put all your eggs in one basket…NO! WAIT!  That should read “saucepan” not basket!  grin/giggle    Ideally, the eggs should cover the bottom of the pan but they should not be crowded.  When Mother Connie filled her 2 quart saucepan,  9 medium sized eggs did not quite cover the bottom but it worked out well.

Holiday 13 and beyond fscc 010From carton to saucepan…

You can see that Mother has salt, vinegar and soda ready to use.  Cover the eggs with water…then liberally salt the raw eggs ensuring that IF one happens to crack, it will not leak out as much egg white as it would without the salt.  Next, sprinkle a 1/2 teaspoon or so of baking soda over the eggs.  This enhances what the salt does.  Finally, drizzle enough vinegar (it doesn’t matter what kind of vinegar you use) to make a foam.  Set the covered pan on the burner, set to MEDIUM heat.  When the water begins to boil, turn the heat to LOW and set your timer for TEN MINUTES.  When ten minutes has passed, take the pan off the heat and put the cooked eggs under tepid running water.

The little gems should peel easily and be smooth on the outside edges.  The yolks should be bright yellow.  If there is a greenish ring around the outside of the yolk, that is indicative  of too much heat or too long cooking time.

Now that you have hard cooked eggs, you can create any number of delicious, nutritious dishes for those you love.  On MONDAY, Mother Connie will show you how to make deviled eggs.  When you learn how to make these, you will know just what to take to your next pot luck dinner!

The response to yesterday’s post was really overwhelming and we thank you who joined the chorus!  As you know, this little corner of the internet is meant to help everyone, but especially those users of  SNAP or WIC or food commodities or goods from a Food Pantry.  There is nothing to buy but we do hope you cruise over to the fellow bloggers we mention from time to time and garner all the goodness they are offering.

We always welcome new Members with open arms and we appreciate hearing from all of you on the comment panel or by email:  foodstampscookingclub@gmail.com  Please remember that each of you is  dearly, dearly loved and appreciated!

Connie Baum

Processing Tomatoes at Food Stamps Cooking Club

September 9th, 2013
These beauties awaited us when we returned from breakfast one recent summer morning.  The Tomato Fairy had landed right on our picnic table!

These beauties awaited us when we returned from breakfast one recent summer morning. The Tomato Fairy had landed right on our picnic table!

When you are given such a wonderful gift, there’s nothing to do but shift into high gear!  We did that!  We turned these flats full of yummy goodness into these delights:

We got 8 quarts from these; we already had 6; over the weekend we canned 8 more quarts.  The Normanator and I make quite the duo!

We got 8 quarts from these; we already had 6; over the weekend we canned 8 more quarts. The Normanator and Mother Connie make quite the working duo!

Canning tomatoes is not particularly hard work.  It’s sorta messy but that’s what soap and water is for.  We just grabbed cleaning rags and scouring powder and the stove looked good as ever when we finished!

We cut out the stem portion and made a slice in the bottom of each tomato.  They were dipped into boiling water until the skin split.  As they were held under cold water that skin peeled off easily!  The skinned tomatoes went into a large heavy kettle to simmer until there was foam at the top.  That was skimmed off and discarded.  We used a potato masher to crush every tomato.  We were using juicy tomatoes and Romas, which are more firm and not as juicy, so we crushed the whole lot of them.

There was a system that worked well for us:  While we worked to cut and skin these babies, the oven was working full time.  We had a jelly roll pan with water, each pan holding 6 jars filled with an inch or so of water.  These, along with the canning lids, hung out in the oven as we worked.

When it came time to fill the jars, The Normanator skillfully put dipper after dipper into the each jar.  As soon as it was full, I was in charge of adding the salt, topping it off with the lid and securing the ring.  Each jar took its place on a towel on the kitchen table as we listened for the “CLICK!” of the lid, making the sound that it had sealed.

There was only one jar that did not seal.  It was morphed into a lovely spaghetti sauce when I poured it into a heavy skillet, added lots of oregano, basil, pepper, and a “blub” of red wine.

SIDEBAR:  No vino?  You can use 1/2 cup of any ole vinegar + 1 or 2 tablespoons of sugar.  Taste test as you go.  *The sugar diminishes the too-tomatoey  flavor of the sauce.  **That’s the purpose of the wine.  END SIDEBAR

Our benefactor told us they have put up over 100 quarts of tomatoes and salsa for the winter!  We are going to have some major good eats at our house this winter, thanks to the Tomato Fairy!  I have a feeling there will be a chili feed or two on the social calendar!

Are you living on a dime?  Do you LOVE to cook?  Do you HATE to cook?  Are you holding an EBT card from SNAP or WIC?  Maybe you have goods from food commodities, a food bank or food drop.  It could be that you just groove on the challenge of stretching your food budgets until you hear George Washington creak…If you are using any form of public assistance, we hope to be of service to you.  You seem to be passing the word, because the membership has SOARED lately.  Maybe that little list of cooking tips is helpful for you.

You most likely have ideas that will help others.  We would love to hear whatever you have to say.  Our most popular  place for ideas is  either on the comment panel or you could send an email to us at foodstampscookingclub@gmail.com.

Above all, please remember that YOU do matter and we love you with no reservation or judgement.  We only want to help.

Connie Baum

The FTC wants you to know there are links on this page. Should they be clicked, resulting in sales, your humble blogger would be fairly compensated. Please do your due diligence when conducting affairs online or offline. Always do business with those you trust implicitly.

Food Storage at Food Stamps Cooking Club

August 8th, 2013
Proper food storage can really  s t r e t c h  your food dollars!

Proper food storage can really s t r e t c h your food dollars!

The Normanator helped Mother Connie fix up a little demonstration about food storage.  Pardon the  extra items on the dining room table; we’ve had a busy morning!  I’m sure you have, too.  grin

The Romaine lettuce you see in the above photo is 11 days from purchase!  It;’s hard to believe that lettuce could keep so well for so long.  The bunch was fresh on the day it was purchased.  It was rinsed and drained and then carefully wrapped in paper toweling.  Then the whole business went into the plastic bag you see there on the table.  It was important to squeeze the air out of the bag so the lettuce could stay cool and not turn brown.  I only take out the leaves I’ll be using and the rest is re-wrapped and put back as I’ve described.

You see a roll of aluminum foil in the photo.  If you bring a bunch of celery home, you can cut off  both ends, rinse thoroughly and use those parts to make veggie broth.

SIDEBAR: To do that, you simply put those end pieces into a saucepan, add water, salt, pepper and any onion pieces you have.  Put a medium heat under that and let it simmer until the celery is soft.  Strain that and save in a jar or refrigerator container.  It’s wise to MARK the date and contents because if it gets shoved to the back of the fridge before you use it, you might wind up with cooked garbage and that won’t save you a dimeEND SIDEBAR

To save the fresh celery ribs, simply shake off the excess moisture and wrap carefully in a kitchen towel or paper toweling.  Wrap aluminum foil around the entire thing, sealing it as you go to keep the oxygen from entering the foil package.  Celery stored in this manner will keep a couple of weeks or longer.  It will not get rubbery, either.

If you have some sort of system for using up leftovers, food storage is not a complicated issue.  For instance, when I make a salad, I will often build more salad than we have appetite to eat.  The leftovers then go into a refrigerator storage container such as the one with the yellow lid shown above, lined with paper towel. The salad goes into the container and is topped off with paper towel.  The dry towels soak up any moisture from the veg and they will not turn brown before the next meal, when they can be slicked up as fresh as ever!

If you cook beans or rice or eggs ahead for use in making lightening fast meals, keep those in a designated area in the fridge so you won’t be growing science experiments!  Make sure you rotate things so they don’t get yucky.  It is perfectly acceptable to discard foods that take up room on a shelf but you know perfectly well your gang will not touch them with a 10 foot pole, let alone EAT them!  The Kitchen Kops will never know and Mother Connie will never tell.

Many years ago, Mother Connie discovered FlyLady…this is a woman who struggled with home care and developed a system of managing house and home and figured out ways to get things done without upsetting your entire life.  One of the things she taught me was to “boogie the fridge” on Wednesdays.  Now, Wednesday is NOT the only day this can be done; you must make this idea work for YOU.  So the notion is that on Wednesday, you look over the fridge, toss what is no good and use whatever you have.  You can take this time to wipe up any spills, freshen the crispers, or take a dish cloth to the door but you are only allowed to spend no longer than 15 minutes for the whole project.  If this idea appeals to you, you might like to try it out.  If you are really excited about learning more of her system you can visit her site:  FlyLady.net.  She has a wealth of information there.

We hope WE, too,  have a wealth of information HERE.  We are tickled pink to see all the new Members who have joined this party!  It is so gratifying to think that we might be helping people and encouraging them in their quest to manage their food dollars with funds from public assistance!

Here’s hoping you can feel our love and concern for you from wherever in the world you are!

*Are you living on a dime?  Do you get food from a food pantry, food bank or food commodities?  Are you holding an EBT  card from SNAP or WIC?  Do you just love the challenge of managing your food dollars?  Are you thrifty by nature?  Do you love to cook?  Do you hate to cook?  In any of the above mentioned cases, we are here to help.  There is nothing to buy but we always hope you come by and leave us some love on the comment panel!

Connie Baum

The FTC wants you to know there are links on this page. Should they be clicked, resulting in sales, your humble blogger would be fairly compensated. Please do your due diligence when conducting affairs online or offline. Always do business with those you trust implicitly.

 

 

 

Peas, Please: Food Stamps Cooking Club

July 24th, 2013

The Normanator is begging for these pleasing plump orbs. He wishes them to be creamed, just like his mother used to make!

One of the things I learned about my new husband all those years ago was that he wanted the vegetables on his plate to be just like those his mother prepared.  He prefers overcooked peas and he loves them to be creamed.

All righty then…I proceeded to present them the way MY mother did them up.  But that was all wrong.

HUH?  How can you do creamed peas incorrectly?

Well, one reason is that his mother never used canned peas in all her born days.  She GREW peas in a ginormous garden and she shelled them, along with help from her half dozen kids.

SIDEBAR:  What’ll you bet there were some great memories made as a family of kids shelled peas with their mother?  END SIDEBAR.

Mother Baum boiled a kettle full of peas, made up a mixture of butter flour and cream (they milked cows, too) into a nice white sauce.  She drained the peas and poured the green beauties into the sauce and added salt and pepper.  Voila`!  Creamed peas!

Those would be delicious; I can appreciate why he likes his mama’s way of doing them.

When I made those peas that ONE TIME my issue was with canned peas.  Hey.  You use whatever you have.  I’m not aware of any food pantry that insists you take frozen peas, not canned.

One way of creating a different-not necessarily better-version would be to add bits of onion or tiny pearl onions if you have some.  And just a tiny dash of nutmeg over it all just before it comes to the table would be a nice addition, no matter what kind of peas you use.  I’m guessing you do not have butter and cream from cows in your yard so feel free to substitute oil and milk or whatever else you keep on hand.  grin/giggle   Oh, some people like new potatoes-or whatever kind you have, even canned will work-added to the peas.  That works!

Are there foods that someone around YOUR table who wishes you’d prepare something differently?  We’d love to hear about it…

If you are living on a dime, using an EBT card from WIC or SNAP or are depending on food commodities and a food pantry to fund your food budget we hope you find help and comfort here.  We GET how hard it is to manage your food dollars and we only want to help you.

We hope to hear from you at foodstampscookingclub@google.com and on the comment panel below this post…because you are dearly loved.

Welcome to the new kids in the Club!  WE LOVE HAVING NEW PEEPS IN OUR MIDST!

Connie Baum

The FTC wants you to know there are links on this page. Should they be clicked, resulting in sales, your humble blogger would be fairly compensated. Please do your due diligence when conducting affairs online or offline. Always do business with those you trust implicitly

PS/If you did not check out the comments on yesterday’s post, you might want to cruise over to Carol’s blogCLICK HERE  She has a great idea for pickles!

 

 

Summer Cukes at Food Stamps Cooking Club

July 23rd, 2013

Cucumbers 003

Our lunch is going to be tasty!

*Things always taste better from a polka dot bowl!

Mother Connie was hanging out with friends over coffee the other day and as often happens, the conversation turned to food!  They each had their own take on what makes cucumbers taste best.

Each told their version of cukes ‘n vinegar with or without onion and/or tomatoes; cucumbers in sour cream…some of the ideas were new to Mother Connie and hit her like a brick!

We were privileged to have benefited from the generosity of those who garden and there were a handful of cucumbers waiting patiently for attention in our refrigerator.  This morning they came to rest in the polka dot bowl you see in the photo above.

Here’s how they were prepared:

1 large cucumber was washed, peeled and sliced thinly.

Onion powder  *I was generous; taste as you go…

SIDEBAR: We’re outta onions!  How can you keep house without onions?  You use onion powder.  Note to self:  Put onions and onion powder on the shopping list!  END SIDEBAR

Rice vinegar was dribbled in a few times around the bowl.  *Any vinegar will do.

Salt was sprinkled over the mixture to bring out the moisture.

Spooned a sugar spoon full of sugar over the whole thing.

Three blobs of sour cream was added and stirred in. *Use whatever amount works for you.  I emptied the carton!

Taste testing was DELIGHTFUL.  These bad boys will soak up the flavors all morning before lunch…yummeee!

The best thing about this concoction is that you can add or substitute zucchinis and create the same effect.  TALK ABOUT THRIFTY!

Along with our cucumbers we will enjoy big bowls of red bean soup.  That will be beans, home made broth, and rice.  If we have room for dessert,  fruit will be available.

Do you visit a food pantry to fund your grocery budget?  Are you a holder of an EBT card for SNAP or WIC?  Do you find yourself living on a dime?  Do you use food commodities?  If you fall into any of these categories or you just love squeezing a nickel til the buffalo bellows, this little blog is meant for YOU.  We are not fancy; we do not beg you to buy anything.  We will send you a series of cooking tips if you sign on as a Member.  Hopefully, you will leave some love on the comment panel or send us ideas at foodstampscookingclub@gmail.com   In any case, you are dearly loved.

Connie Baum

The FTC wants you to know there are links on this page. Should they be clicked, resulting in sales, your humble blogger would be fairly compensated. Please do your due diligence when conducting affairs online or offline. Always do business with those you trust implicitly

Stack ‘Em Up: Food Stamps Cooking Club

July 19th, 2013

Weekends are the perfect time to stir up a batch of pancakes for those you love best! They smell divine, kids love them, and best of all: it’s a really inexpensive meal!

Pancakes on a lazy weekend morning are wonderful!  You may have used a mix in the past.  There is nothing wrong with mixes except that they often contain ingredients and additives you’d be better off without.  I found a wonderful recipe I wanted to share with you Club Members:

Make-at-home Pancakes

*Makes about 8 servings and can easily be doubled

1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour

3 1/2 teaspoons baking powder *For even fluffier pancakes, you can add 1 teaspoon of baking soda as well–jus’ sayin’…

1 teaspoon salt

1 1/4 cups milk

large egg

3 tablespoons butter, melted

  1. In a big bowl, sift together the flour, baking powder, and salt. Make a well in the center and pour in the milk, egg and melted butter; mix until smooth.
  2. Heat a lightly oiled griddle or frying pan over medium high heat. Pour or scoop the batter onto the griddle, using approximately 1/4 cup for each pancake. Brown on both sides and serve hot.

SIDEBAR:  Mother Connie uses the 1/4 cup measuring cup from her set of cups to make pancakes.  This assures uniform size and keeps kids from fighting over whose pancake is bigger! END SIDEBAR

If you’ve been using commercial syrup to pour over your pancakes, you need to know how EZ it is to make your own.  Here is how one of our Members does it:

Make-at-home Syrup

1 cup water

1 cup sugar

dash of salt

Bring the water and sugar to a boil and when the sugar is thoroughly dissolved, add a teaspoon of maple flavoring.  Pour this into a pitcher to pour or pour it into a small bowl with a dipper, such as a gravy spoon.

*Maybe you should double THAT batch, too!  It keeps well and you may need more for all the hungry mouths around your table.

You need not limit your toppings to syrup.  There are lots of berries available this time of year, you might like to toss a few chocolate chips across the golden brown of a pancake or you might have jam or jelly to top off a good breakfast or a leisurely Sunday night supper!

Do you know someone who is living on a dime?  Are there people in your sphere of influence who use funds from WIC or SNAP to fund their food budget?  Who do you know who is frugal and thrifty by nature who might benefit from our series of cooking tips or from this blog?  We are so tickled to greet the new Members every day and we sincerely hope this is a contribution to the world.

Enjoy your weekend and remember that you are dearly loved.

Connie Baum

The FTC wants you to know there are links on this page. Should they be clicked, resulting in sales, your humble blogger would be fairly compensated. Please do your due diligence when conducting affairs online or offline. Always do business with those you trust implicitly

Okra, Ya’ll: Food Stamps Cooking Club

July 18th, 2013

“My mama fried okra but my daddy fed me chocolate!”

People either love okra or they hate it.  There is very little room for “maybe”!  Okra is plentiful and low cost this time of year…if you don’t have it in your garden the chances are good that a generous neighbor, the local grocery or Farmer’s Market will have a good supply.

I found an interesting method for preparing this little veg.  It can be washed, cut and dropped into stews or soups. We have a nephew in Mississippi who makes a mean mess of fried okra every so once in awhile.  He considers this as comfort food. I do not know HIS cooking  method, but here is the one I found out there on the ‘net:

 Frying Okra

*This process is MESSY.  Start with 3 cups of flour but plan to use more.

Wash the veg carefully.  Slice into 1/2″ pieces.  Discard the ends. Put the cut okra into a colander.

Use a ‘batch’ of Crisco; let it melt.  *This is not your average health conscious recipe, just in case you wondered.  As the Crisco melts, break a half dozen eggs into a bowl and beat them slightly.

Fill another bowl with flour and now you have set up assembly line stations with the last stop being your fryer or skillet.

With your hands, toss a handful of okra into the flour.  Shake off the excess and drop the floured okra into the egg mixture.  Then put the floured/egged mess into the flour once again.  Fry this until it is golden brown.  Drain on a cooky sheet on paper towels.

SIDEBAR:  In the interest of frugality, paper towels could be eliminated by using old towels, old T-shirts or any other large clean rag.  END SIDEBAR.

As soon as you get it to the spot where it will drain and while it is very hot, salt it thoroughly.

Repeat this process until all the okra is fried.

Some people eat okra just as it comes out of the fryer; others like to dip it into Parmesan cheese and/or ketchup.

***

I think you could have a bunch of fun with this.  Kids love to get their hands all goopy and they would have a great time “helping”…I’ll leave that decision to Mommy and Daddy.

We have enjoyed the comments that have poured in.  We so appreciate people taking the time to share their thoughts and experiences via the comment panel and the email: foodstampscookingclub@gmail.com

We are thrilled to welcome new Members, too!  It is gratifying to know that we are contributing to others’ lives with our recipes, tips and support.  We GET how hard it is to maintain a food budget, particularly if you depend on public assistance to make it happen.  You are welcomed as a member, too, if you are living on a dime.

If you are using SNAP or WIC funds; if you depend on help from a food pantry or food commodities or any other source, we have dedicated this little blog to YOU.  We are not selling anything; we do not judge you.  We admire your ability to cope and manage.

Do enjoy frying okra and please remember: you are dearly loved.

Connie Baum

The FTC wants you to know there are links on this page. Should they be clicked, resulting in sales, your humble blogger would be fairly compensated. Please do your due diligence when conducting affairs online or offline. Always do business with those you trust implicitly

Hash Mash-Up at Food Stamps Cooking Club

July 15th, 2013

Taters with bacon make a great hash!

One of Mother Connie’s most favorite ways to save grocery money is to  make a simple hash.

You could use any meat left from any meal; you can also use canned tuna, chicken or home canned meats to create a one pot dish that goes together quickly, easily, and on the cheap.

I usually start with onions, if I’m flush enough to have them in the kitchen.  This time of year green onions are available and you can use the entire thing-green part and all.  Those get sauteed in a bit of oil or butter and I can add potatoes in chunks small enough to brown well.  The meat can go in next and after that it’s Cook’s Choice.  I have used bits of broccoli, peas, corn, green beans, asparagus, cabbage, or Chinese cabbage and sometimes I get so many veggies in that skillet it almost overflows!

If The Normanator and I don’t eat every smidgeon of this hash, I put what’s left into a refrigerator container and keep it for soup.  When I make the soup I use the broth I’ve saved-or I make a fresh batch- and I may or may not add more veggies, depending on what’s in the hash and what I have on hand.

This skillet meal is amazingly filling.  Usually we like to have a tomato salad or cottage cheese to accompany the hash.  We may splurge on a fruit dessert, but we are likely to be too FULL!  It all depends on where we are in the month/grocery budget and what’s on hand.

Do you make hash?  What’s your favorite way to put it together?

We need to take a moment to thank all the new Members.  You have signed up for our series of cooking tips and you seem to be relieved that there is nothing to buy!  We appreciate all our Members and we dearly hope this little corner of the internet is helpful to you and yours.

The Food Stamps Cooking Club caters to users of SNAP and WIC; we aim to help users of food pantries, food commodities, food banks and those who are frugal by nature.   If you are living on a dime you might benefit from what we offer; YOU are likely to teach others how to save money on their food budget!

Let us know how we can help YOU, won’t you please?  And do remember that you are dearly loved!

~Connie Baum

The FTC wants you to know there are links on this page. Should they be clicked, resulting in sales, your humble blogger would be fairly compensated. Please do your due diligence when conducting affairs online or offline. Always do business with those you trust implicitly

 

 

Sprouting Seeds at Food Stamps Cooking Club

March 1st, 2013
Sprouting seeds is pretty close to making an indoor garden!

Sprouting seeds is an easy way of making an indoor garden!

Have you always thought that real, organic, greens were beyond your reach because of weather or geography or lack of funds?  Maybe not…

When a close friend was diagnosed with a very serious illness she began to sprout her own little crops of seeds in sunny windows.  All she had was a clear glass jar with a cheesecloth “lid” secured with a canning ring She had jars on window sills all over the South side of her house with seeds at various stages of growth.  She ate those sprouts, along with other raw, organic foods and soon enjoyed vibrant good health once again.  It was a powerful lesson for me in how to be well.

It was a revelation to me that real food was so nutrient dense that it takes less volume of food to satisfy our hunger.  At that time, I was content to fill up on cookies and cakes, not veggies and fruits.  Oh, the lessons that have come Mother Connie’s way.  In those days, we were living on a dime and we fell into the trap of believing that cheaper was better.  We found out, thankfully before our health failed, that real food fills up tummies and satisfies appetites better than “fluff food” or “fake food.” 

A trip to the health food store made it possible to procure a package of tiny seeds that would transform quickly and easily by sitting in sunny windows.  I don’t recall how much that first package cost but I can tell you with certainty that it cost much less than a trip to the doctor.  Our children delighted in watching the seeds become salads and garnishes and snacks and each had his own jar to manage.

There is much ado these days about organic gardening and certified organic…the genetically modified “food” is readily available and dangerous as arsenic BUT IT IS CHEAP, so it is pushed to the consumer as “OKAY for human consumption.”  By growing your OWN food in the comfort of your own home you KNOW it’s safe to eat.

Tending sprouts is super simple.  Keep them moist, rinse them two or three times a day; shake of excess moisture and keep them in the sunshine until they get to be the size you like to eat.  Don’t crowd too many seeds into a jar or they might tend to grow mold.  If you like, you can even spread seeds out over a damp cloth or damp paper towel. 

One of my dear friends told me yesterday that her “sleeping porch” which is lined with expansive windows on the South side of their house is filled with baby plants.  She is already harvesting lettuce from the little pots she has there.  This is an excellent way to grow food, and if you have windows with Southern exposure you could really have some family fun with an indoor gardening project.

There is something magical and therapeutic about growing food.  And it is oh, so healthy.

Users of public assistance hold a special place in Mother Connie’s heart.  Here’s hoping that if you are living on a dime or using food from a food pantry or food bank or if you have food commodities these offerings are helpful to you.  You are welcome to contact Mother Connie with an email to foodstampscookingclub@gmail.com 

~Connie Baum.

The FTC wants you to know there are links on this page. Should they be clicked, resulting in sales, your humble blogger would be fairly compensated. Please do your due diligence when conducting affairs online or offline. Always do business with those you trust implicitly.