Posts Tagged ‘Living On a Dime’

Food Stamps Cooking Club: Member’s Cooking Lesson

January 17th, 2014
Mother Connie has a hodge podge of cookbooks and recipes; some of her food notions live in her head...

Mother Connie has a hodge podge of cookbooks and recipes; some of her food notions live in her head…

You all know by now that the mail you send makes Mother Connie’s heart go pitty-pat!  Today  a message from a Club Member came in that really piqued my curiosity!  Here is what Delaine wanted to share with all of us:

“With food-stamp allotments being so small, and being cut all the time, I know fully how every calorie counts and how to count every calorie.  For me, I am in a very uncomfortable situation that most people do not understand, and that is for some of us, hanging onto every pound we have is as difficult or more difficult than losing weight.  Please do not envy us.  It sounds wonderful, but it is more painful to try to gain weight than lose it, as I have done both.  I was obese until I got sick, and now I am on the other side of the scale of having to try to hang onto every pound, so trust me when I tell you I understand the dilemma.
In the meantime, getting as much nutrition from every food stamp penny is my goal, and even when I am off the social network, as I apparently will be over the next few months, I will still only have the same amount of money for food as I currently have in food allotments.  I have many helps and hints both for stretching food stamp money and using ‘food for cleaning.’ “
Delaine goes on to share how she ACCIDENTALLY learned to make syrup on the cheap:  ” It’s just like the pancake syrup that is 1 cup brown sugar to 6 oz of Dr. Pepper, and boiled down to syrup consistency.  Cheap and accidental, because I was not intending to make pancake syrup when I discovered that!”
SIDEBAR:  Mother Connie is no fan of soda pop but a cook’s gotta do what a cook’s gotta do!  Go with what you have on hand!   END SIDEBAR
Delaine goes on to share her preference for comfort food that won’t break the bank:
“1/2 package elbow macaroni

1  can black beans
1  can corn
2  small cans tomato sauce
Taco season mix – equal parts chili powder, onion powder, garlic powder, cumin and sugar.
2 – 3 tablespoons vegetable oil
The trick to this recipe is to brown the macaroni thoroughly.  It should look like “whole wheat” macaroni.  Drain and rinse the beans and corn and add to the macaroni along with 2 cans of tomato sauce and the spices.  Add 2 tomato cans of water, reduce to a simmer and wait for all the water to be absorbed.  You may need to add water if the macaroni is too stiff.
This goes well with a pan of corn bread.”
SIDEBAR:  Mother Connie strongly suggests you add a green salad or plate of raw veggies OR fruit  to this menu, if that’s  available.  END SIDEBAR
We greatly appreciate Delaine’s contribution to our Cooking Class! 
Those who are living on a dime, people who use public assistance for their food budgets and anyone who holds an EBT card for SNAP or WIC needs all the help they can garner.  If you use a food pantry, food commodities or any other form of public assistance you know that it’s a tough row to hoe.  We hope to help in that regard.
If you have not signed up for our little series of tips, we invite you to do so.  And keep those emails coming!  foodstampscookingclub@gmail.com
We remind you, also, that you are dearly loved.
The FTC wants you to know there are links on this page. Should they be clicked, resulting in sales, your humble blogger would be fairly compensated. Please do your due diligence when conducting affairs online or offline. Always do business with those you trust implicitly.

Food Stamps Cooking Club: Egg Yolk Video Tutorial

January 13th, 2014

People who are learning to cook will discover that sometimes eggs need to have the yolks separated from the whites.  Here is an entertaining way to accomplish that:

Are YOU learning to cook?  Are you receiving public assistance for your food budget?  Do you find yourself living on a dime?  Do you have an EBT card for WIC or SNAP?  Do you visit a food pantry or receive food commodities?  If your answer to any of these questions is ‘yes’ then you have found a place to belong.  This corner of the internet is dedicated to YOU.  There is nothing to buy and no obligation…how refreshing is THAT?

This video is part of the series we are calling our Cooking Class.  We believe that if you know how to cook you can save all kinds of money.  We know this from our own life experience.

We just love hearing from you…either on the comment panel below this post or by email:  foodstampscookingclub@gmail.com.

Please  bear in mind that you are dearly loved.

Connie Baum

The FTC wants you to know there are links on this page. Should they be clicked, resulting in sales, your humble blogger would be fairly compensated. Please do your due diligence when conducting affairs online or offline. Always do business with those you trust implicitly.

 

Food Stamps Cooking Club is Making GRAVY!

January 10th, 2014

If you were blessed with a food bundle at holiday time, you may have found a packet of gravy mix in your bag of goods.  I’m happy for you if you did, but I’d be more thrilled if you learned how EASY it is to prepare gravy.  AND HOW CHEAP IT IS!

A packet of gravy mix runs around $1.29.  For only a few cents you can have gravy in jig time.  You can make as much or as little as you need.  You can use broth, milk or water to make it.  Milk makes good gravy to go over biscuits; it goes well with fried chicken, too!  If you use broth or water with your meat drippings you’ll have a fine, dark gravy that goes well over mashed potatoes,  with roast beef or pork.  Either type of gravy makes a great addition to soups with leftover goodies from meals that were not completely devoured at first blush!

Thickener for gravy can be flour, cornstarch, or arrowroot.  USE WHAT YOU HAVE ON HAND.  When gravy is made with flour, leftover gravy can be reheated without being lumpy if you warm it slowly.  If it’s made with cornstarch it will be  thicker but will still reheat nicely if the temp is kept lower.  It will require your attention to keep it from getting too hot too fast…

 

Some time ago Mother Connie made this little video.  I hope you find it helpful:

 

You could be one who just loves to be frugal.  You and yours might be living on a dime.  It’s possible you are an EBT cardholder for WIC or SNAP.  Maybe you have things from a food pantry.  You might be consuming  food commodities.  Without a doubt, you probably watch your food budget like a hawk.  Those who are on public assistance for their food dollars know that learning to cook will save them lots of money over the long haul.  We dearly hope to help you in that regard.

Our number of Members is climbing!  We have YOU to thank for that!  We love the things you put on our comment panel and we adore your email messages at foodstampscookingclub@gmail.com   Thank you SO MUCH.

Please remember that you are dearly loved and cherished.

Connie Baum

The FTC wants you to know there are links on this page. Should they be clicked, resulting in sales, your humble blogger would be fairly compensated. Please do your due diligence when conducting affairs online or offline. Always do business with those you trust implicitly.

Food Stamps Cooking Club and Veggie Prep

January 9th, 2014

According to the Food and Drug Administration each of us needs from FIVE to NINE servings of fruits and vegetables daily.  Five is the minimum; nine is the ideal number.

The issue sometimes can be that the cook often hears “I don’t LIKE that” and it can be not only frustrating for the cook but a deterrent to good health.

So let’s talk about carrots.  They may not be a kid’s most cherished favorite but I have an idea to share-one I pinched from a FABULOUS cook in a nearby town.

First, I would caution you about baby carrots.  You know-those  little perfectly shaped cuties, packaged in handy/dandy plastic sacks.  No tips or tails to trim...these are made from carrots that are not “pretty” enough to appeal to the public.  So they are dunked in a toxic bath and trimmed to look good enough to SELL.  They are not health enhancing.  In my view, they are just like toxic bullets.  If you get a package of them and they hang around long enough, you will learn that they do not spoil.  That’s your clue that baby carrots are not good to eat.

That said, let me tell you about regular carrots and how to make them irresistible:

Trim and scrub 2 carrots for every person you’ll feed.

Slice them the way you like to see them.  It’s easy to cut them to look like coins; it’s equally easy to grate them.  The smaller the cut, the quicker they will cook.

Add some water, sprinkle some salt over the potful and allow them to cook til tender.

While they cook, very finely chop 2 ribs of celery and 1/2 of a small onion.  You may saute these in a bit of oil to enhance the flavor or you can add them as is to the cooking carrots.  The choice is yours.

When they are cooked, drain the water and add a spoonful of MAYO and a chunk of CREAM CHEESE.  Stir these into the hot veggies.  You may want to taste; they might need salt and pepper.

I first ate this dish at a pot luck meal.   I went from table to table to discover who had brought those carrots because I HAD to learn how to make them.  I asked for the recipe and the cook giggled and told me there was no recipe.  Then she described what I shared with you.  I have always loved carrots, cooked or raw, so I actually get hungry for this!

Here’s hoping this carrot dish delights YOU the way YOU delight Mother Connie.  The mail just makes tears in my eyes sometimes.  Here is our email address:  foodstampscookingclub@gmail.com   You are also welcome to put a message on our comment panel below this post.

Are you living on a dime ?  Do you depend on an EBT card for SNAP or WIC?  Are you a regular at the food pantry or food bank?  Do you get food commodities?  Maybe you just love being frugal.  In any case, this blog is devoted to helping you with your food budget.  No judgements, nothing to buy.  Just some help.  Maybe you could think of this corner of the internet as your cyber next door neighbor or long distance auntie!

Connie Baum

The FTC wants you to know there are links on this page. Should they be clicked, resulting in sales, your humble blogger would be fairly compensated. Please do your due diligence when conducting affairs online or offline. Always do business with those you trust implicitly.

Food Stamps Cooking Club: French Toast!

January 8th, 2014

WordPress will not load the gorgeous image of the finished product!

If you plan ahead, you can delight the people who put their toes under your table with a “fancy schmancy” meal, even if you are just learning to cook!

French Toast is fun, filling and fabulous.  It is easy to make, pretty to serve, and it is satisfying in the way of comfort food..

Mother Connie put several slices of bread into a 8 X 8″ casserole dish and covered the bread with a mixture of 2 beaten eggs and some milk–enough to cover the bread.  It went into the fridge to hang out til morning.

*There is a great image of these slices, soaking.  Alas, it won’t load!  argh

You can use a lightly greased skillet or a griddle, depending on what you own and how many mouths you’ll be feeding.  We use a griddle, with the temp set at 350*- but when I turn on the griddle I also set the oven to 2oo*.

The bread soaks up the milk and egg mixture.  I place each slice on the very lightly greased griddle and let it brown nicely before I turn it.  When each slice is browned on both sides and removed from the griddle, it goes onto an oven safe platter or casserole dish.  These freshly done slices get to lounge in the oven for about 8 to 10 minutes.  This allows a nice crust to form and make them crisp.  **This is how it’s done in high end eateries!

When it comes out of the oven, you can dress it up with a very light sprinkle of powdered sugar.  I use my flour sifter.

We like to top our French Toast with honey or home made syrup.  Sometimes we put a few berries on the top or maybe a slice or two of peaches.  Our favorite bread to use is Lithuanian Sourdough Rye because it is a heavy bread but any bread will do.

Here’s how to make the syrup.  Once you make this you will never buy commercial syrup again.

The image of the syrup in the cutest pitcher ever will NOT load!  *argh!

Home Made Syrup

Into a heavy saucepan put

2 cups sugar

2 cups water

dash salt

Bring this to a rolling boil and make sure all the sugar is dissolved.  Remove from the heat and add 2 – 3 teaspoons maple flavoring.  Pour the syrup into a pitcher or bowl with a serving spoon.  Pour any leftover syrup into a jar.  I store syrup in the kitchen cabinet.

Those of you who have been Members here for awhile know full well that this corner of cyberspace is devoted to users of public assistance for their food budgets.  If you are a holder of an EBT card for SNAP or WIC, we hope you are getting helpful information here.  Maybe you are living on a dime or you just make a game out of being frugal.  You might frequent your food pantry or you might be using food commodities.  Whatever your situation, and especially if you are just learning to cook, we are so proud to have you in the House!

When we read the emails that pour in; when we read the love you leave on the comment panel, it’s patently obvious there is a need for the service we hope to provide.

Connie Baum

The FTC wants you to know there are links on this page. Should they be clicked, resulting in sales, your humble blogger would be fairly compensated. Please do your due diligence when conducting affairs online or offline. Always do business with those you trust implicitly.

PS/Do take a moment, when you can, to cruise over to Creative Savv and CT On a Budget.  They have such great info for saving $$$.  And their images DO load…sigh..

 

 

Food Stamps Cooking Club’s Class Is All Souped UP!

January 7th, 2014

Cooking Class Home Imp Kay 038Soup’s ON!

It seems as if most of the United States is in the deep freeze!  What could be more warming than a bowl of hot soup on a frigid day?  We have a wonderful soup to share with you.  There is a wee bit of a story to go with it:

When I was a little girl my mother used to make what she called “Our Favorite Vegetable Soup” and I loved it so. I think of it as a comfort food. She made it quite often and as I grew up and took up in my own kitchen, I made it as often as she did.  It really WAS our favorite soup!

Mom came to live with us as her health began to fail and one day I came home from work to discover that she had “commandeered” our kitchen to delight us with steaming bowls of this luscious comfort food!  It was the very last meal she ever prepared.

It might become YOUR favorite soup, too.  It’s super easy and quick to make and you can vary it to suit YOUR fancy.

Our Favorite Vegetable Soup

To begin:

1 small onion, chopped

2 or 3 ribs of celery, chopped

3 or 4 carrots, chopped

Saute in a bit of vegetable oil.  Salt and pepper.  Cook until tender but firm.

Cooking Class Home Imp Kay 008Veggies saute very quickly over medium high heat.

Continue by putting into a soup pot: 1/2 package of macaroni *I prefer gluten free but YOU use what YOU like.

Cooking Class Home Imp Kay 013This is how Mother Connie stores her pasta; here it has been freshly removed from the freezer!

Put the sauteed veg into the soup pot with the macaroni and  4   cups of chicken broth, if you have it.  *Use water if you don’t have broth.

Cook this combo on medium heat until the macaroni is tender,stirring occasionally.

When the macaroni is cooked BUT NOT MUSHY, add 3 – 4 cups of milk and heat thoroughly.

If you like a thin soup, this is IT.  If you like a thick soup, sprinkle some instant mashed potatoes (or leftover mashed spuds) into the pot until it is the consistency you and your family like best.

Taste test to see if you need more seasonings.  This can take a good bit of salt, especially if you add potatoes.  This soup is lovely when served  with a dark bread or green salad-or both.

This will make 6 – 8 servings.  I always hope to have leftover soup so I can freeze it for an easy meal another time.

Those of you who have been Members for awhile know that we cater to users of WIC or SNAP and are EBT  card holders.  We also hope to help users of food pantries, food commodities; anyone who uses public assistance for their food budgets.  A good number of you are living on a dime.  Many people have not learned to cook.  We hope this little Offline Cooking Class will help those who are interested to know how to prepare simple meals on a tight budget and still maintain nourishing foods will get the help needed to really make their way around the kitchen.

You have no doubt noticed there is no loud voice, begging you to BUY stuff.  *Are you relieved?

You are welcome to share our information on Facebook or with those who sit in your circle.  Lots of people need help these days; together we could make a real difference in the world!

Please remember you are dearly loved.

Connie Baum

The FTC wants you to know there are links on this page. Should they be clicked, resulting in sales, your humble blogger would be fairly compensated. Please do your due diligence when conducting affairs online or offline. Always do business with those you trust implicitly.

Food Stamps Cooking Club Unveils Offline Cooking Class!

January 2nd, 2014

Oatmeal 002

This is the very first day of our Food Stamps Cooking Club Offline Cooking Class!

 

There are a great many supporters to thank – Lorraine Wellman, Renita Farrall, Velda Koehler, who have been exuberant cheerleaders of this blog; Lili and Carol, my fellow bloggers who never cease to inspire me with their own menus, tips n tricks, comments and general encouragement; the good folks at Living On a Dime, who feel like family to me and Leanne Ely, who got me hooked many years ago with her Garlic Lime Chicken and her quest: Saving Dinner.

The idea with this class is to teach anybody how to prepare simple, low cost foods. There is nothing fancy or complicated about these recipes and tutorials. Best of all, we aren’t making any effort to sell you stuff! We want everyone to be healthy and to do that at the lowest possible cost.

Here is our very first offering:

Overnight Oatmeal

1 cup oats *Mother Connie prefers whole oat groats but use whatever you have

1 cup raisins* optional but this adds nutrition…just sayin’

handful of finely chopped nuts *walnuts, pecans, peanuts–whatever Santa left you

3 cups water or water and milk

dash of salt

Put everything into a covered saucepan or casserole dish and slide it into the oven after supper.  Set the temp for 200* and let the oven do the work for you.

In the morning you will be delighted NOT to have to make breakfast.  Simply take off the lid, stir a bit and dish it up!

*This would work well with a slow cooker too, but Mother Connie has not made it that way..yet.  grin/giggle

We like ours served with a sprinkle of cinnamon and a dash of nutmeg, along with a spoonful of either brown or granulated sugar.

No oven?  A toaster oven will do just fine.  Please, please do not use a microwave oven because they emit dangerous Electro Magnetic Frequencies and rob your food of its nutritive value.

We sincerely hope this will contribute to your life in a positive way!  You are dearly loved!

Connie Baum

The FTC wants you to know there are links on this page. Should they be clicked, resulting in sales, your humble blogger would be fairly compensated. Please do your due diligence when conducting affairs online or offline. Always do business with those you trust implicitly.

 

 

To Can or Not to Can…at Food Stamps Cooking Club

September 10th, 2013
To soak or not to soak?  This age old question has been debated before.  Here we'll take another look to see what we ought to put into that bowl!

To soak or not to soak? This age old question has been debated before. Here we’ll take another look to see what we ought to put into that bowl!

It may not be soup weather as you read this.  IT IS 94* here today!  But soup weather will soon be upon us.  If you have beans on your shelf, you are going to be in the soup…but in a GOOD way!  Enjoy this one, kids!

Those of you who have food commodities sometimes get cans of beans…those of you who think of canned beans as ‘convenience foods’ watch for sales like hawks hunt for  prey!  Those of you who have practiced frugality like an art form may prefer canned beans but they may also like the challenge of soaking dry beans.

To be honest, soaking beans CAN be challenging.  Sure, all you do is throw them into a pot and let them sit and soak.  BUT you also have a house to keep, a job to be on time for-if you are fortunate to HAVE a job, maybe two!-and then there is the small matter of keeping your gang fed on whatever schedule everyone in the house has going! And we have not even mentioned getting everyone to school/work/wherever OR the laundry… It’s enough to drive a person out of their ever lovin’ mind!  I’m sure you can relate.

So I found a soup recipe that calls for 8 cans of beans.  There was a huge debate in Mother Connie’s head about whether to mention it, since the price of canned beans is obscene.  I’m quite sure you could make this with only one type of bean to make it easy on the bean soakers of the world; if you have the where-with-all to get 8 cans, that’s good.  If not, you might make only half a recipe IF that will feed your gang.  Use your own good judgement.  I offer it here for your perusal:

Eight Can Soup with a South of the Border Flair

I do not recall the source…emails abound in the Club House…

1 (15 oz.) can each: drained and rinsed, black beans, pinto beans, diced tomatoes, sweet corn. *Personally, Mother Connie would not RINSE corn…

1  15.25 oz can chicken, drained *The Kitchen Police will not write you up if you use leftover cooked chicken…

1 (10.75 oz.) can cream of chicken soup

1 (10 oz.) can green enchilada sauce

1 (14 oz.) can chicken broth  *Nobody will die if you use home made broth or even water with a bouillon cube or two.  We are all about saving $$ in the Club

1 packet taco seasoning 

**Mother Connie is DEATH on seasoning packets!  They are full to the top with rubbish the human body does not need to maintain good health!  Surely you have chili powder on hand!  You are most likely to have cumin.  You’ll save a bundle by NOT using packets and your budget with thank you for keeping a few spices on your shelf.  Seriously, kids.  You CAN be healthy on a tight budget.

Toss everything into your favorite soup pot.  Heat through gently but thoroughly, stirring every so once in awhile.

This soup is hearty, tasty, and would pair up quite well with a green salad and corn or tortilla chips.  Mother Connie does not normally recommend chips but there are times when chips are just the thing.  *I already ranted and raved about the seasoning packets; I’ll let up now.  ;)

If you are holding an EBT card from SNAP or WIC, if you are using food commodities or things from a food pantry, food bank, food drop, or any other form of public assistance, we are delighted to be of service to you.  Most everybody finds themselves living on a dime at times… We dearly hope our ideas and recipes help to keep your food costs at bay.  We hold no judgement and we are not about selling you stuff.  We are tickled pink whenever we see new names on our roster (which has been every day, thanks to all our Members’ spreading the good word!) and we love hearing from each of you.

It may not be soup weather as you read this.  *IT IS 94* here today!  But soup weather will soon be upon us.  If you have beans on your shelf, you are going to be in the soup…but in a GOOD way!  Enjoy this, kids!

Connie Baum

The FTC wants you to know there are links on this page. Should they be clicked, resulting in sales, your humble blogger would be fairly compensated. Please do your due diligence when conducting affairs online or offline. Always do business with those you trust implicitly.

 

 

 

Processing Tomatoes at Food Stamps Cooking Club

September 9th, 2013
These beauties awaited us when we returned from breakfast one recent summer morning.  The Tomato Fairy had landed right on our picnic table!

These beauties awaited us when we returned from breakfast one recent summer morning. The Tomato Fairy had landed right on our picnic table!

When you are given such a wonderful gift, there’s nothing to do but shift into high gear!  We did that!  We turned these flats full of yummy goodness into these delights:

We got 8 quarts from these; we already had 6; over the weekend we canned 8 more quarts.  The Normanator and I make quite the duo!

We got 8 quarts from these; we already had 6; over the weekend we canned 8 more quarts. The Normanator and Mother Connie make quite the working duo!

Canning tomatoes is not particularly hard work.  It’s sorta messy but that’s what soap and water is for.  We just grabbed cleaning rags and scouring powder and the stove looked good as ever when we finished!

We cut out the stem portion and made a slice in the bottom of each tomato.  They were dipped into boiling water until the skin split.  As they were held under cold water that skin peeled off easily!  The skinned tomatoes went into a large heavy kettle to simmer until there was foam at the top.  That was skimmed off and discarded.  We used a potato masher to crush every tomato.  We were using juicy tomatoes and Romas, which are more firm and not as juicy, so we crushed the whole lot of them.

There was a system that worked well for us:  While we worked to cut and skin these babies, the oven was working full time.  We had a jelly roll pan with water, each pan holding 6 jars filled with an inch or so of water.  These, along with the canning lids, hung out in the oven as we worked.

When it came time to fill the jars, The Normanator skillfully put dipper after dipper into the each jar.  As soon as it was full, I was in charge of adding the salt, topping it off with the lid and securing the ring.  Each jar took its place on a towel on the kitchen table as we listened for the “CLICK!” of the lid, making the sound that it had sealed.

There was only one jar that did not seal.  It was morphed into a lovely spaghetti sauce when I poured it into a heavy skillet, added lots of oregano, basil, pepper, and a “blub” of red wine.

SIDEBAR:  No vino?  You can use 1/2 cup of any ole vinegar + 1 or 2 tablespoons of sugar.  Taste test as you go.  *The sugar diminishes the too-tomatoey  flavor of the sauce.  **That’s the purpose of the wine.  END SIDEBAR

Our benefactor told us they have put up over 100 quarts of tomatoes and salsa for the winter!  We are going to have some major good eats at our house this winter, thanks to the Tomato Fairy!  I have a feeling there will be a chili feed or two on the social calendar!

Are you living on a dime?  Do you LOVE to cook?  Do you HATE to cook?  Are you holding an EBT card from SNAP or WIC?  Maybe you have goods from food commodities, a food bank or food drop.  It could be that you just groove on the challenge of stretching your food budgets until you hear George Washington creak…If you are using any form of public assistance, we hope to be of service to you.  You seem to be passing the word, because the membership has SOARED lately.  Maybe that little list of cooking tips is helpful for you.

You most likely have ideas that will help others.  We would love to hear whatever you have to say.  Our most popular  place for ideas is  either on the comment panel or you could send an email to us at foodstampscookingclub@gmail.com.

Above all, please remember that YOU do matter and we love you with no reservation or judgement.  We only want to help.

Connie Baum

The FTC wants you to know there are links on this page. Should they be clicked, resulting in sales, your humble blogger would be fairly compensated. Please do your due diligence when conducting affairs online or offline. Always do business with those you trust implicitly.

Roadside Stands Help Food Stamps Cooking Club

September 6th, 2013
Looky what WE found at a roadside stand in North Central Nebraska!

Looky what WE found at a roadside stand in North Central Nebraska!

It’s been a busy week here in the Club House–we have hosted a Book Lovers Club meeting; we have had surprise visitors, which we always enjoy, and on Thursday we took the day to travel to Central Nebraska on business.  We did toss in some pleasure, too:

We had a ginormous pizza loaded with sauerkraut, lots of meat and cheese and spices that tickled our taste buds.  Only one slice was plenty for a meal!  WOW.  This was served at a tavern in the quaint and charming town of Dannebrog, Nebraska.

We had a ginormous pizza loaded with sauerkraut, lots of meat and cheese and spices that tickled our taste buds. Only one slice was plenty for a meal! WOW. This was served at a tavern in the quaint and charming town of Dannebrog, Nebraska.

Visiting the roadside stands this time of year is wonderful!  We picked out a watermelon, a red pepper the size of my head, and some squashes: a turban squash and a butternut squash.  Everything looked so tempting and delish!  There was a wide variety of tomatoes, cucumbers, zucchinis, melons, onions, squashes, and the workers all talked about the crops that are still being harvested.

The sight of new vineyards popping up along the landscape was a treat for our eyes, too.  We visited a winery but they were so busy harvesting the grapes they were not available for tastings or serving meals.  We’ll just have to make another road trip at a later date! ;)

Soon Mother Connie will be posting a recipe for a casserole featuring spaghetti squash.  It is sooo mouth watering in a photo I saw that I cannot wait to make one and show all of you.  The spaghetti squash will be ready to pick very soon;  you WILL be kept in the loop!

The squash featured in the above photo make luscious soups for fall.  The recipe for squash soup has been featured here before but when a new batch of soup comes out of the Club House Kitchen, you guys will be the very first to know!

For those of you who have recently become Members of our merry band of foodies, we welcome you.  We are happy to help anyone but especially we like to focus on those who use public assistance for their food budgets.

Those who use EBT cards for WIC or SNAP and those who depend on  food commodities, food pantries, food banks, and the generosity of gardeners have told us repeatedly that the help we offer is really helpful and for that we are grateful.  We hold no judgments and we are not out to sell you stuff!  We hear, also, from people who simply like the challenge of wrestling with the food dollars to see how far those dollars might  S  T  R  E  T  C  H !  We are painfully aware of how you are all living on a dime and we love you madly.

Your comments mean the world to us.  Thanks for stopping by.  We are working diligently on plans for the Cooking Class; you are in that loop, too!  We hope it will be helpful for you in keeping your food costs to a minimum!

Connie Baum

The FTC wants you to know there are links on this page. Should they be clicked, resulting in sales, your humble blogger would be fairly compensated. Please do your due diligence when conducting affairs online or offline. Always do business with those you trust implicitly.